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Diamond Probes for Multifunctional AFM

Robert Carpick

TEM image showing diffraction pattern confirming nanocrystalline diamond structure)

TEM image showing diffraction pattern confirming nanocrystalline diamond structure)

Diamond, the stiffest and strongest material, is also biocompatible. We are growing, characterizing, and functionalizing diamond for use as an enabling tool for nano/bio AFM studies, including diamond-coated AFM tips (right), and diamond nanopillars (below).

Diamond Probes for Multifunctional AFM

Middle: SEM image of an array of diamond-coated silicon nanopillars formed by FIB milling into a nanocrystalline diamond film. Left: One of these pillars in a in-situ TEM indentation experiment, after having been indented by a flat diamond punch indentor (upper right of image). The Si exhibits dislocations (dark bands) while the diamond remains in-tact with no apparent damage. The simultaneously-acquired force-displacement data from the measurements is shown on the right.

Diamond Probes for Multifunctional AFM

Left: Hydrogen terminated diamond surface and a molecule tailored to bond with diamond. Strong, stable C-C linkages are obtained by photochemical attachment of the alkene group. The particular tripod structure shown has been demonstrated to be extremely stable and provide more selective bonding of the ligand R to receptors on the sample to be investigated. Right: AFM lithography with diamond nanoprobes. A 30 x 30 µm2 AFM image of a 3x3 array of PAA domains in a PtBA film formed by contact with the functionalized NCD tip.

 

Nano/Bio Interface Center @ The University of Pennsylvania
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