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NanoDay@Penn

NanoDay@Penn 20152015 Image Contest Entries

 

STRIPS  

2015 Best Artistic Image Winner

Forest of Graphene Sheets

The figure presents a forest of vertical graphene sheets, also known as carbon nanowalls, grown on a copper substrate.

Only colors have been modified from original photo, taken in JEOL SEM.

     
Micro- Flower  

2015 Best Scientific Image Winner

Micro-Flower

Scanning electron microscope image of 3D plasmonic nanoantenna arrays. The metal‐dielectric bilayer microbeams were modified with nanoslot antenna array which supports localized surface plasmon resonances at near infrared wavelengths. The microbeam curled up due to the stress in the thinfilm, forming a "micro flower".

     
 

2015 Best Animation Winner

STRIPS

Solvent Transfer Induced Phase Separation (STRIPS) in action. Formation of porous polymer fibers or bicontinuous liquid fibers that can function as channels for the transport of molecules.

https://youtu.be/cl2sczwaOlo

     
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These are gold nanoparticles encapsulated in polyanhydride poly-[bis(pcarboxyphenoxy) propane (PCPP) polymer nanoparticles. The PCPP nanoparticles (orange) are of size 100nm and the gold nanoparticles (green) are of a 5nm size. It is interesting to see how the gold nanopartilces concentrate at the center of the PCPP nanoparticles creating a "frogspawn" like structure. These are very useful in the medical industry for imaging. They would be used as contrast agents and it would be easy to use them to target specific parts of the body and image certain body tissues that are usually hard to image.

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Micro Push-pins

Scanning electron microscope image of silicon dioxide microdisks with silicon stems reluctantly connected to the substrate, forming a bundle of objects like "push‐pins".

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Suspensions of polystyrene beads (one micron in diameter) in ethanol were drop deposited onto microscope slides, and  self-assembled in a hexagonally close packed monolayer. Image taken using atomic force microscopy.

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A 200 nm layer of aluminum was deposited onto the monolayer of hexagonally close packed beads ( each 1 um in diameter). The beads were then dissolved, leaving behind an array of aluminum posts. Image taken using atomic force microscopy.

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A 90 nm layer of gold was deposited onto the array of  200 um aluminum posts; after dissolving the posts in aluminum etchant, a gold film remains patterned with an array of triangular wells (90 nm deep and 250-300 nm on a side). These  wells can be used as zero mode waveguides for single molecule FRET experiments, allowing labeled subtrates to be used at physiological concentrations with minimal background signal.  Zero mode waveguides are commercially created with electron beam lithography at a 50-fold higher cost than these fabricated using natural colloidal lithography.   Images taken with scanning electron microscopy

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A 90 nm layer of gold was deposited onto the array of  200 um aluminum posts; after dissolving the posts in aluminum etchant, a gold film remains patterned with an array of triangular wells (90 nm deep and 250-300 nm on a side). These  wells can be used as zero mode waveguides for single molecule FRET experiments, allowing labeled subtrates to be used at physiological concentrations with minimal background signal.  Zero mode waveguides are commercially created with electron beam lithography at a 50-fold higher cost than these fabricated using natural colloidal lithography.   Images taken with scanning electron microscopy.

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A 90 nm layer of gold was deposited onto the array of  200 um aluminum posts; after dissolving the posts in aluminum etchant, a gold film remains patterned with an array of triangular wells (90 nm deep and 250-300 nm on a side). These  wells can be used as zero mode waveguides for single molecule FRET experiments, allowing labeled subtrates to be used at physiological concentrations with minimal background signal.  Zero mode waveguides are commercially created with electron beam lithography at a 50-fold higher cost than these fabricated using natural colloidal lithography.   Images taken with atomic force microscopy.

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NanoleavesFall

This Unique TEM image reminds me of a mix of leaves on ground during fall. They are actually gold and silver nanoparticles.

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NanoPopcorn

These particles are gold and silver nanoparticles. Gold forms a thick non‐uniform coat around silver particles. They look like pop‐corn under TEM

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NanoRaspberries

In the presence of a capping polymer, gold particles form raspberries like structures while gathering together on silver crystals.

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Swarm of NanoCaltraps

This beautiful picture represents a novel structure of gold and silver nanoparticles. Each of the structures remind us of caltraps.

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Porous polymer fibers fabricated by Solvent Transfer Induced Phase Separation (STRIPS)

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Bicontinuous liquid fibers fabricated by Solvent Transfer Induced Phase Separation (STRIPS)

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Bicontinuous liquid fibers fabricated by Solvent Transfer Induced Phase Separation (STRIPS)

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Bicontinuous liquid fibers fabricated by Solvent Transfer Induced Phase Separation (STRIPS)

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Porous polymer fibers fabricated by Solvent Transfer Induced Phase Separation (STRIPS)

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PMMA on suspended Silicon Nitride 

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graphene on copper 

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graphene on copper 

     

 

 

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