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Events

NanoDay@Penn 2014

NanoDay@Penn 2014Each year, the Nano/Bio Interface Center highlights nanotechnology across Penn. High school classes, undergraduate and graduate students, postdocs and faculty participate in exhibits, demonstrations, tours, posters and talks. Most events are open to the public. Details will be posted on this page [ NanoDay@Penn ]

NanoDay@Penn 2013NanoDay@Penn has been held annually since 2005.

[ pictures from 2013 ]
[ pictures from 2012 ]

 

PA Nanotechnology 2012: Nanotech's Role in Advancing PA's Economy

PA CapitalJune 5, 2012
Harrisburg University

The PA Nanotechnology conference explores viable nano-based strategies, programs, and resources to assist economic development via education and job creation and retention. It will promote collaborative nanotechnology research, education, technology transfer, entrepreneurship, and commercialization within the Commonwealth. By connecting education and industry, the conference will help provide a platform to enhance innovation, technology transfer, course curricula, job skills, and business growth. This event is an opportunity to publicize and promote PA leadership in nanotechnology R&D, education, and sustaining technology businesses. Promising new technologies and PA businesses will be highlighted.

NBIC is an organizing sponsor of this event.  Others include:  PA Department of Community and Economic Development, A.J. Drexel Nanotechnology Institute, Carnegie Mellon University, Harrisburg Area Community College, Harrisburg University of Science and Technology, Lehigh University Center for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, Penn State Materials Research Institute, Penn State Center for Nanotechnology Education and Utilization, and University of Pittsburgh Petersen Institute of NanoScience and Engineering.

Details and access to registration tools are found at:
www.harrisburgu.edu/academics/undergrad/biotechnology/pa-nano-reg.php

[ Link to article in Central Pennsylvania Business Journal ]
[ Download conference flyer ]

Distinguished Scholar Talk and Reception

April 2, 2012
LRSM Auditorium

Yung Woo ParkThe NBIC will celebrate the distinguished career of Professor Yung Woo Park, 2012 Visiting Distinguished Scholar, on April 2.  Park is Professor of Physics at the Seoul National University in South Korea.  His primary research interests are in condensed matter physics and nanostructures such as polymer nanofibers and carbon nanotubes. Professor Park was awarded the Korean Science Award in Physics and the Grand Prize for the Nano Research Innovation from Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST), South Korea.  Park returns to Penn where earned is Ph.D. in 1980.  Please join the NBIC in honoring Professor Park on April 2, 2012 at 3:30 PM in the Auditorium of the LRSM. The title of his talk is: Carbon Nanoelectronics – Zero M Resistivity and More.  A reception will follow in the Reading Room.

Symposium: Building Cellular Complexity One Molecule at a Time

March 30, 2012
BRB Lobby and Auditorium, Perelman School of Medicine

Cell Biology and Biophysics are benefiting from technologies developed in the physical sciences and engineering that enable adding elements of cellular complexity to functional assays constructed from purified biological components.  The symposium "Building Cellular Complexity One Molecule at a Time" will gather investigators and prominent invited speakers for a one-day workshop covering advances and applications to important biological and health-care problems. The symposium is sponsored by the School of Medicine, the Nano/Bio Interface Center, and the Pennsylvania Muscle Institute.  The four outside speakers are leaders in this new approach, representing Biological Physics, Mathematics and Engineering.  Local faculty and junior investigators will contribute as well.  The workshop features talks and a diverse set of poster presentations from students and post-docs explaining fabrication expertise and target applications that are amenable to integrating physical, theoretical, and engineering approaches to understanding cell biological and macromolecular function.

[ Click to download symposium flyer ]

Registration is online at:  http://www.med.upenn.edu/pmi/nbic_registration_2012.shtml

Why is a Cloud like a Volcano

LRSM Science Cafés

The scientists at the LRSM have developed these Science Cafés to help inform the local community about what we are studying, what we are discovering, and how it can have an impact in your life. These open and accessible forums gather monthly at The Dark Horse Pub & Stoney’s British Pub to discuss one topic of the many areas of science the LRSM studies. Come listen, learn, and question the scientists who's research impact our daily lives. This month (November 14, 2011) Bill Berner, from the University of Pennsylvania's Physics Department, will tell us "Why is a cloud like a volcano?" Bill will share interesting facts and demonstrations to explain some of the most important behaviors in weather and geology. For complete listings, go to the LRSM Science Cafés page.

NanoDay@Penn 2011

NanoDay@Penn 2011Each year, the Nano/Bio Interface Center sponsors a full day of exhibits, demonstrations, and laboratory tours to highlight nanotechnology research across the campus. Area high school classes participate along with undergraduate and graduate students alike. This event is crucial to boosting student interest in science, technology, engineering, and math-related careers. This year's event is on October 26, 2011.

go to the [ NanoDay@Penn ] page for more information

Nano/Bio Interface Center Symposium:
Local Probes at the Frontiers of Energy Systems and Biotechnology

Since the early days of scanning tunneling microscopy and atomic force microscopy, a large family of probes have been developed that access properties with ever increasing complexity and relevance. This symposium highlights recent advances that forward fundamental underpinnings of critical interactions in energy systems as well as molecular and cellular biology. 

Don EiglerSymposium Featured Address
NBIC Award for Research Excellence in Nanotechnology
Wednesday, October 26, 2011

4:00 PM (reception will follow)
Wu and Chen Auditorium, Levine Hall
The University of Pennsylvania
Don Eigler, The Small Frontier
[ view bio ]

 

Scanning Probes Symposium
Thursday, October 27, 2011
8:30 AM – 6:30 PM
Irvine Auditorium  (directions)
The University of Pennsylvania
3401 Spruce Street
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

program sponsor:
Asylum Research

Invited speakers include

Dawn Bonnell, University of Pennsylvania
What Local Probes of Dielectric Function Reveal About Energy Transfer
Dennis Discher, University of Pennsylvania
AFM as an Essential Tool in Cell and Molecular Biology Studies
Marija Drndic, University of Pennsylvania
Imaging of Nanocrystals with Correlated Scanning Probe and Transmission Electron Microscopy
David Ginger
, University of Washington
Time-Resolved Electrostatic Force Microscopy on Organic Solar Cells
Yale E. Goldman
, University of Pennsylvania
Tracking Position and Rotation of Single Fluorescent Probes for Molecular Mechanics
Sergei Kalinin
, Oak Ridge National Lab
Probing reversible and irreversible electrochemistry in nanoscale volumes: batteries, fuel cells, and memristors
Lukas Novotny
, University of Rochester
From Near Field Optics to Optical Antennae
Arvind Raman
, Purdue University
Multi-harmonic dynamic AFM for mapping the local material properties of live cells and viruses in liquid environments
Ozgur Sahin
, Columbia University
Probing Nanomechanics of Biological Systems on the Microsecond Timescale

Please register before October 24, 2011.  This event is free but registration is required: [ register on-line ]

Hotel Information

Sheraton Philadelphia University City Hotel
Deanna Gonzalez, Group Sales Manager
3549 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104
P. 215.387.8000

* A limited number of discounted rooms at the Sheraton University City are available if reserved by October 5, 2011.
[ reserve on-line ]

 

The Trustees' Council for Penn Women Lecture in Chemistry

Dawn Bonnell

"Polarization Mediated Properties at Interfaces: A path towardnovel molecular devices"
Dawn A. Bonnell
Trustee Chair Professor, Materials Science Department
Director, Nano/Bio Interface Center

Tuesday, April 5, 2011
4:00 PM

Carolyn Hoff Lynch Lecture Hall
Chemistry Complex
231 South 34th Street

For more information on the Trustees' Council for Penn Women, please see:
http://www.alumni.upenn.edu/groups/tcpw/

 

A Family Event

Philly Materials DayJoin us on Saturday, February 5, 2011 for Philly Materials Day at Drexel University's Bossone Research Enterprise Center on Market Street between 31st & 32nd Streets. Click here for details, a schedule and directions [ http://phillymaterials.org/ ]

NANODAYS@PENN 2010

NANODAYS@PENN 2010

Tuesday, October 26, 2010
Networking Around Research and Careers in Nano  (3:00 – 6:00 PM, LRSM Auditorium)

Join the conversation about career pathways from a select panel of representatives from  industry and education sectors.  Stay for a second panel focusing on sensors for medicine and the environment.  The final program is a research poster session and reception.  Please RSVP to nbicasst@seas.upenn.edu.

Wednesday, October 27, 2010
NanoDay@Penn 2010

Each year, the Nano/Bio Interface Center sponsors a full day of exhibits, demonstrations, and laboratory tours to highlight nanotechnology research across the campus.  Area high school classes participate along with undergraduate and graduate students alike.  This event is crucial to boosting student interest in science, technology, engineering, and math-related careers. 

[ download schedule for Wednesday, 10/27/10 ]
[ download schedule for Tuesday, 10/26/10 ]

 

2010 Award for Research Excellence in Nanotechnology

Angie Belcher

Angela Belcher
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Wednesday, October 27, 2010
4:00 PM
Wu and Chen Auditorium in Levine Hall

Angela Belcheris a materials chemist with expertise in the fields of biomaterials, biomolecular materials, organic-inorganic interfaces and solid-state chemistry. Her primary research focus is evolving new materials for energy, electronics and the environment.

 

Science Cafe features Yale Goldman on October 20 at the Marathon Grill (Mar Bar)

Follow link to reserve your spot http://www.upenn.edu/pennnews/sciencecafe/

Yale Goldman"Nature's Nanotechnology: Biomolecules Explored One at a Time"
Yale E. Goldman, Professor of Physiology, Pennsylvania Muscle
Institute, Associate Director of the Nano/Bio Interface Center

Nanotechnology will miniaturize computers, communications devices, sensors, actuators, and drug delivery vehicles. The challenge confronting researchers is to develop new manufacturing concepts essential to capturing the promise of the industry. So, we look to Nature. Nature has already solved the design and assembly issues in making robust nanometer-sized machines. Macromolecules and supramolecular assemblies carry out myriad cellular roles, producing motion, shape changes, signaling, and processing of genetic information with remarkable agility.

Goldman will discuss these natural nanomachines and how advances in technology enable understanding their adaptation to their nano-scale environment.

RSVP is required, http://www.upenn.edu/pennnews/sciencecafe/

NANODAY@ PENN 2009

Wednesday, October 28, 2009

NanoDay@PENNEach year, the Nano/Bio Interface Center sponsors a full day of exhibits, demonstrations, and laboratory tours to highlight nanotechnology research across the campus.  Area high school classes participate along with undergraduate and graduate students alike.  This event is crucial to boosting student interest in science, technology, engineering, and math-related careers.

» read more

2009 Award for Research Excellence in Nanotechnology

Harold CraigheadHarold Craighead
Cornell University

Wednesday, October 28, 2009
4:00 PM in the
Wu and Chen Auditorium in
Levine Hall

Dr. Craighead's recent research activity includes the use of nanofabricated devices for biological applications. His research continues to involve the study and development of new methods for nanostructure formation, integrated fluidic/optical devices, nanoelectromechanical systems and single molecule analysis.

« read more about the award »

 

Geometric and Electronic Structure in One Dimensional Nanosystems

Young KukYoung Kuk

Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University
& Center for Nano Science and Technology, NIST

August 10, 2009
4:00 – 5:30 PM

Berger Auditorium, Skirkanich Hall

In most of passive and active devices, charge carriers flow through a bulk wire or sometimes near its surfaces/interfaces. In a one dimensional nanodevice, the transport property may be quite different from bulk devices. We have studied model one-dimensional devices, such as carbon nanotube, Si nanowire and graphene. We have tried to understand the geometric and electronic structures or the transport properties of these nanowires using scanning tunneling microscope (STM), atomic force microscope (AFM), scanning Kelvin probe microscope, electrostatic force microscope (EFM) and scanning gate microscopes (SGM). We begin to learn many new physics, such as 1) different screening behavior in 1-D, 2) deviation from a Fermi liquid, 3) different defect bands from those in the 3-D counter parts, and 4) size effect in superconducting nanodot.

DNI / LNN PA Regional Nanotechnology Conference

Collaborating in Today’s Economy

May 27, 2009
9:00 – 4:15
Co-Sponsor: Drexel University

Today’s economic environment poses great challenges to businesses, government and academia. Pennsylvania’s future economy and workforce will be affected by new initiatives such as development and implementation of green technologies and alternative energy. The PA Initiative for Nanotechnology (PIN), established by the Department of Community and Economic Development in 2005, plays a key role in these areas. Three regional organizations - Drexel University’s DNI, the LNN of Lehigh University, and The Nanotechnology Institute (NTI) – operate under the PIN strategy to help businesses succeed. At this first joint DNI / LNN conference, these organizations and other participants will present their capabilities and resources, and lead discussions on issues impacting businesses involved in nanotechnology. Tours of DNI research facilities will also be offered. Key topics include:

  • How nanotechnology can affect your business
  • How businesses view and implement nanotechnology
  • How businesses, academia, and government work together - opportunities for research resources, funding, collaboration, and education

This event is open to all involved in business and technology management, research, collaboration, technology commercialization, and economic development in and around Pennsylvania. Register now by contacting Holly Burnside, Program Coordinator, A.J. Drexel Nanotechnology Institute, hcb23@drexel.edu or 215-895-6630. There is no charge for attending this event. Directions to the Bossone Research Enterprise Center can be found at http://nano.drexel.edu/Consortium/Directions.aspx.

AGENDA:

  • 9:00 AM Registration and Networking (light breakfast)
  • 9:45 AM Welcome & Introductions
  • Yury Gogotsi, Ph.D., D. Sc., Director, A. J. Drexel
    Nanotechnology Inst.
  • Gene Lucadamo, LNN Academic Chair, Industry Liaison, Lehigh
    University Center for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology
  • 10:15 AM Speaker (To be announced)
  • 10:45 AM Break
  • 11:00 AM Dr. Harch Gill, Lehigh Nanotech, LLC
  • 11:30 AM Dr. Louise Sengupta, BAE Systems
  • 12:00 PM Summary of DNI and Lehigh programs for industry support
    Shirin Karsan (DNI) and Gene Lucadamo (Lehigh University CAMN)
  • 12:30 PM Lunch (Sponsor – Woodcock Washburn, LLP)
  • 1:00 PM Dr. Thomas Armstrong, University Liaison/ Nanotech Program Manager
    PA Department of Community & Economic Development
  • 1:45 PM Panel Presentations: Perspectives/challenges/best practices
    Moderator: Anthony Green (NTI)
  • 2:15 PM Panel Open Discussion
  • 2:45 PM Closing Remarks
  • 3:00 PM
    Group 1: Networking
    Group 2: Tour of Centralized Research Facility
  • 3:30 PM
    Group 2: Networking
    Group 1: Tour of Centralized Research Facility
  • 4:15 PM Adjourn

Nanotechnology for the Study of Cellular and Molecular Interactions

June 14-June 18, 2009
Il Ciocco Hotel and Conference Center
Barga (Tuscany), Italy

Barga, ItalyOn behalf of Engineering Conferences International and the conference chairs, Kathleen Stebe (University of Pennsylvania) and Denis Wirtz (Johns Hopkins University), and the conference co-chair, Shouheng Sun (Brown University) it is my pleasure to extend this invitation to you to participate in the forthcoming conference, Nanotechnology for the Study of Cellular and Molecular Interactions, to be held June 14-18, 2009 at the Il Ciocco Resort and Conference Center just outside of Barga (Tuscany), Italy.

The registration and payment information can be found on the
Conference Website

The conference page includes:

  • Preliminary Program
  • ECI registration form
  • Conference general and fee information
  • Payment information form
  • Pre/Post conference hotel reservation forms

We strongly encourage you to register before April 30 in order to take advantage of the "early bird" rate.* After April 30 the normal registration fee applies. All conference payments should be received by May 10. Your reservation will be tentative until we receive payment.
*If no payment has been received by May 20, we reserve the right to cancel your reservation.

Nanotech Commercialization Conference:

28th Oct 2008

The Nanotechnology Institute is proud to announce our first Nanotechnology Conference: “From Discovery to Commercialization” to be held October 28, 2008 at the Chemical Heritage Foundation, 315 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. Confirmed speakers include E. Clayton Teague, Director of the National Nanotechnology Coordination Office, Brad Pietras, Director of Nanotechnology Programs at Lockheed Martin Corporation, and Josh Wolfe, Co-Founder and Managing Partner of of Lux Capital. The symposium is being co-sponsored by the NanoBusiness Alliance, the Department of Community and Economic Development of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Ben Franklin Technology Partners of Southeastern Pennsylvania, the Mid-Atlantic Nanotechnology Alliance (MANA), and several other regional partners.  This event will provide a comprehensive overview of nanotechnology with panels discussing nanobio, nanomanufacturing, nanoenergy and commercialization/funding. Click here for more info.

NanoDay@Penn 2007

The 3rd Annual NanoDay @ Penn a success

The Nano/Bio Interface Center hosted NanoDay @ Penn 2007 on October 24, 2007.  The goal of NanoDay@Penn is to raise awareness across the community about the progress and promise of nanobiotechnology.  Visitors throughout the day include university students, faculty, and staff along with science classes from local high schools

This year, participating high schools included Northeast High School, High Technology High School, and the Westtown School.  Students and teachers visited the exhibits and posters developed by research groups and hosted by graduate students.  Schools also had the opportunity to tour various labs and facilities such as the GRASP (robtotics) Lab, the Penn Regional Nanotechnology Center, the Nano/Bio Probes Innovation Facility and the microfab lab.  A multimedia show runs in the exhibits halls throughout the day and features images and animations developed by graduate students to help illustrate the fascinating world at the nanometer scale. 

Twenty high school students participated in the high school research fair.  Award winners from last year’s Delaware Valley Science Fair were invited to NanoDay to display their posters in Levine Hall.  Later in the day, teams of graduate students talked with each high school participant about their research and later selected their favorite projects.  This year’s NanoDay high school award winner were:

Senior Projects

1st Place: Franz Sauer, High Technology High School
2nd Place: Avni Patel, Wissahickon High School
3rd Place: Devin Redding, Avon Grove High School

Junior Projects

1st Place: Janet Song, Methacton High School
2nd Place: Rebecca Roelofs, Charter School of Wilmington
3rd Place: Deepthi Shashidhar, Great Valley High School

Sophomore Projects

1st Place: Christine Kurian, Charter School of Wilmington
2nd Place: Kathleen Yu, North Penn High School
3rd Place: Elizabeth Robbins, Academy of Notre Dame de Namurs

Awards for graduate student research and the multimedia graphics competition were announced at a ceremony in the afternoon.  Michael Fischbein, graduate student in the Drndic Group (Department of Physics and Astronomy) was presented with the NBIC Graduate Award for Research Excellence for his work in nanosculpting allowing the creation creating nanogaps.  Graduate student Bob Johnson in Charlie Johnson group won award for animation designs for the second year in a row.  The Johnson Group also won the award for the best NanoDay exhibit.

The 2007 NBIC Research Excellence Award was presented to Dr. Charles  Leiber of Harvard University.  His talk was titled, Nanotechnology and the Life Sciences:  From Ultrasensitive Disease Detection to Hybrid ‘Smart’ Materials.

Mark your calendars now for NanoDay @ Penn 2008 to be held Wednesday, October 29, 2008.

NBIC Award for Research Excellence in Nanotechnology

Charles M. Lieber

Research Excellence Award

Recipients:
2005 Recipient: HORST L. STORMER
2006 Recipient: STEVEN M. BLOCK
2007 Recipient: CHRISTOPH GERBER

Nanotechnology and the Life Sciences: From Ultrasensitive Disease Detection to Hybrid ‘Smart’ Materials

Wednesday, October 24, 2007
4:00 PM
Wu & Chen Auditorium, Levine Hall
3330 Walnut Street

Charles M. LieberCharles M. Lieber was born in Philadelphia.  He attended Franklin and Marshall College and graduated with honors in Chemistry.  After doctoral studies at Stanford University and postdoctoral research at the California Institute of Technology, he became an Assistant Professor position at Columbia University in 1987 embarking on a new research program addressing the synthesis and properties of low-dimensional materials.  Lieber moved to Harvard University in 1991 and now holds a joint appointment in the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, as the Mark Hyman Professor of Chemistry, and the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.  Lieber has pioneered the synthesis of a broad range of nanoscale materials, the characterization of the unique physical properties of these materials and the development of methods of hierarchical assembly of nanoscale wires, together with the demonstration of applications of these materials in nanoelectronics, nanocomputing, biological and chemical sensing, neurobiology, and nanophotonics.  He has developed and applied a new chemically sensitive microscopy for probing organic and biological materials at nanometer to molecular scales..  Lieber is an elected member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Fellow of the American Physical Society, the Institute of Physics and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.  Lieber is Co-Editor of Nano Letters, and serves on the Editorial and Advisory Boards of a number of science and technology journals.  He has published more than 280 papers and is the principal inventor on more than 30 patents.  In his spare time, Lieber founded a nanotechnology company, Nanosys, Inc., with the goal of revolutionizing commercial applications in chemical and biological sensing, computing, photonics and information storage.

 

NBIC Award for Research Excellence in Nanotechnology

Christoph Gerber

AFM Technology: Beyond Imaging Applications,
Towards Personalized Medical Diagnostics

Friday, February 23, 2007
3:00 PM
Berger Auditorium, Skirkanich Hall
210 South 33rd Street

Christoph GerberChristoph Gerber is Director for Scientific Communication of the National Center of Competence for Nanoscale Science at the Institute of Physics, University of Basel, Switzerland, and formerly a research staff member in nanoscale science at the IBM research laboratory in Rüschlikon. He has served as project leader on various programs of the Swiss National Science Foundation. For the past 25 years, his research has focused on nanoscale science as a pioneer in scanning probe microscopy, making major contributions to the invention of the scanning tunneling microscope and the atomic force microscope (AFM). He is a co-inventor of biochemical sensors based on AFM technology. He is author and co-author of over one hundred scientific papers and has been cited more than 14,500 times in crossdisciplinary fields placing him among the “one hundred worldwide most cited researchers in physical sciences.” Gerber is a fellow of the American Physical Society and a fellow of the Institute of Physics (UK). His IP portfolio contains 37 patents and patent publications.

 
Inustry Launch

Industry Highlight 2007

Working Together to Bring Technology to Society

Friday, February 23, 2007, 3:00 PM
Penn Museum

Inustry Launch PanleAs globalization influences the approaches industry takes to technical research and development, corporations and universities must find new paths toward productive relationships.  On February 23, 2007, a distinguished panel of university and industry leaders assembled at the University of Pennsylvania’s Nano/Bio Interface Center to discuss exciting opportunities and complex challenges around university/industry partnerships.  Corporate representatives came from DuPont, IBM, and Johnson and Johnson as well as Sandia National Laboratory.  Christoph Gerber of the University of Basel in Switzerland presented his view of the future of nanotechnology and opportunities these kinds of collaboration will afford.  The discussion among the panelists centered on nanotechnology, biotechnology, computation, and information technology.

        Download the - - Industry Launch Program - -

The proceedings of the event are now available on-line in either a podcast (MP3) version, or streaming video (Real Player™ required):

 

The 2nd Annual NanoDay @ PennNanoDay@Penn 2006

The Nano/Bio Interface Center hosted NanoDay @ Penn on October 25, 2006.  The goal of NanoDay is to raise awareness across the community about the progress and promise of nanobiotechnology.  Visitors throughout the day include university students, faculty, and staff along with science classes from local high schools

students around a poster

This year, participating high schools included Martin Luther King High School, High Technology High School, Microsoft School for the Future, and the Westtown School.  Students and teachers had the opportunity to interact with exhibits and posters developed by the graduate students and tour various labs and facilities.  The multimedia show that runs throughout the day featured graphic images and animations developed by graduate students to help illustrate the fascinating world at the nanometer scale. 

Twenty-four high school students participated in the high school research fair.  Award winners from last year’s Delaware Valley Science Fair were invited to NanoDay to display their posters in Levine Hall.  Later in the day, teams of graduate students talked with each high school participant about their research and later selected their favorite projects.  This year’s NanoDay high school award winner were:


Senior Projects

students around poster

1st Place:  Raja Srinivas, High Technology High School
2nd Place: Eric Prouty, Central Bucks High School West
3rd Place:  Inna Alecksandrovich, George School

Junior Projects

1st Place:  Franz Sauer, High Technology High School
2nd Place: Kayla Reneé Cahill, High Technology High School
3rd Place:  Mouleena Khan, Methacton High School

Sophomore Projects

1st Place:  Janet Song, Methacton High School
2nd Place: Katie Anderson, Methacton High School
3rd Place:  Deepthi Shashidhar, Great Valley High School

Awards for graduate student research and the multimedia graphics competition were announced at a ceremony in the afternoon.  P. Peter Ghoroghchian, a MD/PhD graduate student in the School of Medicine was presented with the NBIC Graduate Award for Research Excellence for his work in emissive polymer vesicles.  Two graduate students in Charlie Johnson group, Andre Brown and Bob Johnson won awards for their graphics and animation designs while the Park Group won an award for the best NanoDay exhibit.

Steven M. Block

NanoDay keynote speaker, Dr. Steven M. Block was awarded the 2nd Annual NBIC Research Excellence Award.  Block is a biophysicist and professor at Stanford University in both the Department of Biological Sciences and the Department of Applied Physics.  His laboratory has pioneered the use of laser-based optical traps (or “optical tweezers”) to study the nanoscale motions of individual biomolecules.  His group was the first to develop instrumentation that resolved the individual molecular steps taken by kinesin motors moving along microtubules, which measure 8nm.  Block is a strong proponent of nanoscience and the potential interplay between biology and nanotechnology.

Concluding the day’s events, Penn Nanotech Society hosted a Careers in Nanotech Forum.  Representatives from research and design, law, venture capital, and policy discussed their roles in nanotech and provided insight on what companies look for in recruits.  After the panel and question and answer session, students were able to meet and greet the guests.

Mark your calendars now for NanoDay @ Penn 2007 to be held Wednesday, October 24, 2007. 

>> View photos from the day's events >>

 
The Ultimate Challenge for Nano/Bio Probes
Download the brochure

The Ultimate Challenge for Nano/Bio Probes

January 16 and 17, 2006
The University of Pennsylvania
Philadelphia, PA 19104

The Nano/Bio Interface Center at the University of Pennsylvania , with the support of the National Science Foundation, is nucleating an International Molecular/Nano Probe Network. The goal of the workshop is to develop a value proposition for the Network that will incorporate the needs of various constituencies. Furthermore, a long range 'grand challenge' will be developed to focus the technical vision. Network participants to date include:

Y. Goldman (USA), R. Palmer (UK), Y. Kuk (Korea), M. Welland (UK), S. Lindsay (USA), L. Eng (Germany), S. Kalinin (USA), D. Rugar (USA), B. Huey (USA). A. Engel (Switzerland), L. Novotny (USA), V. Dravid (USA), M. Roco (NNI), M. Garner (Intel), C. Prater (Veeco)

Topics to be explored include:

  • Combined TIRF- Traps-SPM
  • Multiple Modulation Probes
  • Moving PFM into the Bio Arena
  • Spatially Resolved Spectroscopy of Biological Molecules
  • 3-D Tomography of Bio Molecules
  • Discovery Platforms
  • Protein Mechanics

*A more comprehensive program will be available shortly.

 

Registration

Registration will be accepted via this Web site, e-mail , or phone (215-746-3210).
Online registration is available by clicking here.

Lodging and Travel

The 2006 NBIC International Molecular/Nano Probe Network Workshop will be held in Philadelphia , Pennsylvania at the Laboratory for Research on the Structure of Matter (LRSM) - located 30 minutes from the Philadelphia International Airport and two blocks from the Hilton Inn at Penn Hotel. Day two of the workshop will take place at the Inn at Penn.

International Visitors Please click here for important information.

The Nano/Bio Interface Center has reserved a block of rooms with the Inn at Penn Hotel. Reservations can be made using the information below:

HOTEL RESERVATION DEADLINE: January 3, 2005

The Hilton Inn at Penn
3600 Sansom Street
Philadelphia , PA 19104
Phone Reservation: 215-222-0200
Online Reservation: http://www.theinnatpenn.com/
Room Rate is $199/night + 14% tax

 

NanoDay @ Penn 2005

October 26, 2005

NanoDay@Penn BannerThe Nano/Bio Center opened its doors and sponsored a full day of activities and special events on 26 October 2005. NanoDay @ Penn offered the University community as well as local high school science classes, an opportunity interact with researchers involved in the exciting phenomena at the nanometer scale.

>> View photos from the day's events >>

Over 150 high school students participated in the day’s events. Many students visited with their high school science classes. Visiting schools included Northeast High and Communication Technology High, both of which had teachers in the summer Research Experience Teachers program. Other schools included Philadelphia High School for Business and Technology, the Westtown School, and High Tech High School from New Jersey. Each group was able to tour the many exhibits and posters developed by graduate students. Many groups were able to get a behind-the-scenes look at the new Nano/Bio Innovation Probe Facility, the Microfabrication Laboratory, and the Penn Regional Nanotechnology Facility. There, students were able to learn about various types of microscopes and characterization instruments used to work at the nanoscale.

Over thirty high school researchers displayed their work at NanoDay @ Penn. Last year’s award winners from the Delaware Valley Science Fair were invited to bring their research posters that were on display throughout the day on Levine Hall. Later in the afternoon, teams of graduate students fanned out to interview each of the students and select their favorite projects. The winners were:

Senior projects

1st place - Rebacca Lineman, Bishop McDevitt High School
2nd place - Christopher Janover, High Technology High School
3rd place - Daniel Lang, Lang Homeschool

Junior projects

1st place – Amanda MacKereth, Avongrove High School
2nd place – Joe Kovacs, Bethlem Catholic High School
3rd place – Neil Nyak, The Charter School of Wilmington

Sophomore projects

1st place – Franz Sauer, High Technology High School
2nd place – Mouleena Khan, Methacton High Schoool
3rd place – Matthew Ricci, Boyertown High School

The day concluded with an awards ceremony for the high school researchers. Rui Shao, who recently completed is doctoral studies in the Materials Science and Engineering Department was the first recipient of the NBIC Graduate Award for Research Excellence. The audience was then treated to a thrilling talk by Professor Horst Stormer of Columbia University. After his talk, Dr. Stormer was awarded with the 1st Annual NBIC Research Excellence Award.

If you were not able to attend this year, please mark your calendar for next year. NanoDay @ Penn 2006 will be held on Wednesday, October 25, 2006. Please join us.

 

RET Reception a Success

October 18, 2005

RET receptionMany of the high school science teachers participating in the 2005 Research Experience for Teachers program returned to campus on Tuesday, 18 October 2005 to share their research posters with faculty and staff at Drexel and Penn. The event provided and opportunity to see old friends and discuss the nanoscale science that kept these teachers busy for five weeks this past summer. In additional to university faculty, staff, and graduate students, several teachers came with their principals and some even brought students.

Alan B.  RET & Principals


 

Nano/Bio Interface Center @ The University of Pennsylvania
info@nanotech.upenn.edu
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