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Award for Research Excellence in Nanotechnology

Research Excellence in Nanotechnology Award

Each year, the NBIC presents an award recognizing an outstanding research scientist from the international community. The Award for Research Excellence in Nanotechnology is presented at a ceremony capping off the NanoDay@Penn event on late October. Similarly, a graduate student from the Penn community is also recognized. The graduate student honoree presents a brief talk prior to the keynote presentation.

2014 Award for Research Excellence in Nanotechnology

Charles MarcusCharles Marcus

Wednesday, October 22, 2014
4:00 PM in the
Glandt Forum
Krishna P. Singh Center for Nanotechnology

Control Without Measurement: The Profound Challenge of Quantum Information

Charles Marcus is the Villum Kann Rasmussen Professor and Director of the Center for Quantum Devices at the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. Marcus was born in Pittsburgh PA, grew up in Sonoma CA, and was an undergraduate at Stanford University (1980-84). He received his Ph.D. from Harvard University where he continued as an IBM postdoctoral fellow. He taught at Stanford (1992–2000) and Harvard (2000–2012), and served as director of the Harvard Center for Nanoscale Systems (2004–2009). Marcus's research focuses on quantum coherence in electron devices and solid-state implementations of quantum information processing systems. Recent work includes experiments on spin control in semiconductor quantum dot systems, control of electronic states in nanowires, carbon nanotubes and graphene, development of hyperpolarized nanoparticles for medical imaging, interferometry in the fractional quantum Hall effect, and detection of Majorana fermions in semiconductor/superconductor hybrid structures. Marcus is author of over 170 papers with more than 18,000 citations. He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society and the AAAS, and recipient of the Newcomb-Cleveland Prize from the AAAS.

 

Past Recipients

2013 Award for Research Excellence in Nanotechnology

Joseph W. LydingJoseph W. Lyding

Wednesday, October 23, 2013
4:00 PM in the
Glandt Forum
Krishna P. Singh Center for Nanotechnology

Silicon-Based Nanotechnology: Progress, Challenges and Spin-Offs

Joseph W. Lyding received his PhD in 1983 in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at Northwestern University, and in 1984 he joined the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at the University of Illinois. In 1986 Prof. Lyding developed one of the first STMs in the US, which he used to study charge density waves. This work evolved to studies of silicon surfaces under ultrahigh vacuum, where Lyding developed his atomic resolution hydrogen resist process that was adopted by groups worldwide. Prof. Lyding co-invented, with Prof. Karl Hess, deuterium processing, a means of dramatically extending the lifetimes of silicon CMOS transistors that is now used in large-scale commercial production. In 2003 Professor Lyding developed the Dry Contact Transfer process that enables a broad range of nanostructures to be integrated with atomically clean surfaces. His group also used STM spectroscopy to make the first observation of the predicted metallic state of the zigzag edge of graphene. He invented the field-directed sputter sharpening process for making AFM and STM probes, and is Chief Technical Officer of Tiptek, LLC, a startup company formed to commercialize the technology. Professor Lyding is a Fellow of the American Vacuum Society, American Physical Society and the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers. He is the recipient of the IEEE Nanotechnology Council's Pioneer Award in Nanotechnology (2012) and the AVS Nanotechnology Recognition Award (2013).

 

2012 Award for Research Excellence in Nanotechnology

Toshio AndoToshio Ando

Wednesday, October 24, 2012
4:00 PM in the
Wu and Chen Auditorium in
Levine Hall

High-speed Atomic Force Microscopy: Nanoscale Visualization of Dynamic Biomolecular Processes

Toshio Ando is a biophysicist specializing in the development and use of measurement techniques for understanding the functional mechanism of proteins. In the last two decades he has been developing high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM) techniques to directly visualize protein molecules in action at high spatiotemporal resolution. His group has made extensive efforts and various improvements to the HS-AFM making it now highly advanced for practical use. The exquisite dynamic images filmed in recent studies have been continuously demonstrating that this new microscopy is a powerful tool capable of revealing the process and structure dynamics of biological molecules in stunning detail. HS-AFM is expected to transform structural biology and biophysics as well as revolutionize our understanding of biological molecules.

Toshio is Professor of Physics and Biophysics and Director of Bio-AFM Frontier Research Center.at Kanazawa University. Before joining the faculty at Kanazawa, he worked at UC San Francisco as a postdoctoral fellow and then an Assistant Research Biophysicist from 1980 to 1986. Professor Ando and his colleagues received a number of awards including Nikkei BP Technology Prize (2003), Nanoprobe Technology Prize of JSPS (2004, 2010), Hokkoku Culture Prize (2005), Distinguished Service Award of the President of Science Council of Japan (2007), Sakaki Prize of JSPS (2008), Award of the Surface Science Society of Japan (2010), Yamazaki-Teiichi Prize from Foundation for Promotion of Material Science and Technology of Japan (2010), and Uchida Prize Medal from Foundation for Promotion of Cardiovascular Research (2012).

 

2011 Award for Research Excellence in Nanotechnology

Don EiglerDon Eigler

Wednesday, October 26, 2011
4:00 PM in the
Wu and Chen Auditorium in
Levine Hall

The Small Frontier:  The Future of Scanning Probe Microscopy

Don Eigler is a physicist who has specialized in the development and use of low temperature scanning tunneling microscopes. His research is aimed at understanding the physics of nanometer-scale structures and exploring the applications of nanometer-scale structures to computing.  Don is best known for his 1989 demonstration of the ability to manipulate individual atoms with a low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope.  Since then, his group’s results include the invention of "quantum corrals," discovery of the "quantum mirage" effect, demonstration of a fundamentally new way to transport information through a solid, the demonstration of nanometer-scale logic circuits based on Molecular Cascades, and the invention of a powerful new technique to study the magnetic properties of nanometer-scale structures: Spin Excitation Spectroscopy.   

Don joined IBM as a Research Staff Member in 1986, was named an IBM Fellow in 1993 and retired from IBM in 2011.  He has been recognized for his accomplishments with the Kavli Prize in Nanoscience, the Davisson-Germer Prize, the Dannie Heineman Prize, the Newcomb-Cleveland Prize, the Grand Award for Science and Technology, and the Nanoscience Prize.  He is a fellow of the American Physical Society and the American Association for the Advancement of Science as well as a member of the Max Planck Society and the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters.  In addition to his professional pursuits, Don has been building his skills as a trainer of service dogs, specializing in dogs that assist people with mobility impairments.

 

2009 Award for Research Excellence in Nanotechnology

Harold CraigheadHarold Craighead
Cornell University

Wednesday, October 28, 2009
4:00 PM in the
Wu and Chen Auditorium in
Levine Hall

Dr. Craighead joined the faculty of Cornell University as a Professor in the School of Applied and Engineering Physics in 1989. From 1989 until 1995 he was Director of the National Nanofabrication Facility at Cornell University. Dr. Craighead was Director of the School of Applied and Engineering Physics from 1998 to 2000 and the founding Director of the Nanobiotechnology Center from 2000 to 2001. He served as Interim Dean of the College of Engineering from 2001 to 2002 after which he returned to the Nanobiotechnology Center as Director. He has been a pioneer in nanofabrication methods and the application of engineered nanosystems for research and device applications. Dr. Craighead's recent research activity includes the use of nanofabricated devices for biological applications. His research continues to involve the study and development of new methods for nanostructure formation, integrated fluidic/optical devices, nanoelectromechanical systems and single molecule analysis.

 

2008

Naomi Halas

Naomi J. Halas
Rice University

Wednesday, October 29, 2008
4:00 PM
Wu & Chen Auditorium, Levine Hall
3330 Walnut Street

The 2008 Research Excellence Award in Nanotechnology was awarded to Professor Naomi Halas during the annual NanoDay@Penn. Halas is Stanley C. Moore Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Professor of Chemistry, and Professor of Bioengineering at Rice University. She is best known for inventing nanoshells, a new type of nanoparticle with tunable optical properties. Other awards include an NSF Young Investigator Award, three Hershel Rich Invention Awards, the 2003 Cancer Innovator Award, and the 2000 CRS-Cygnus award for Outstanding Work in Drug Delivery. She was also awarded “Best Discovery of 2003” by Nanotechnology Now and was named finalist for Small Times magazine’s 2004 Nanotechnology Researcher of the Year. Naomi Halas was honored on October 29th at 4:00 PM in the Wu and Chen Auditorium in Levine Hall. Her talk entitled, When Plasmons Interact, Worlds Collide: Optics At The Nano-Bio Interface, focussed on how metallic nanostructures are being designed and engineered as optical components.

 

2007

Charles M. Lieber

Charles M. Lieber
Harvard University

Nanotechnology and the Life Sciences: From Ultrasensitive Disease Detection to Hybrid ‘Smart’ Materials

Wednesday, October 24, 2007
4:00 PM
Wu & Chen Auditorium, Levine Hall
3330 Walnut Street

Charles M. Lieber was born in Philadelphia.  He attended Franklin and Marshall College and graduated with honors in Chemistry.  After doctoral studies at Stanford University and postdoctoral research at the California Institute of Technology, he became an Assistant Professor position at Columbia University in 1987 embarking on a new research program addressing the synthesis and properties of low-dimensional materials.  Lieber moved to Harvard University in 1991 and now holds a joint appointment in the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, as the Mark Hyman Professor of Chemistry, and the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.  Lieber has pioneered the synthesis of a broad range of nanoscale materials, the characterization of the unique physical properties of these materials and the development of methods of hierarchical assembly of nanoscale wires, together with the demonstration of applications of these materials in nanoelectronics, nanocomputing, biological and chemical sensing, neurobiology, and nanophotonics.  He has developed and applied a new chemically sensitive microscopy for probing organic and biological materials at nanometer to molecular scales..  Lieber is an elected member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Fellow of the American Physical Society, the Institute of Physics and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.  Lieber is Co-Editor of Nano Letters, and serves on the Editorial and Advisory Boards of a number of science and technology journals.  He has published more than 280 papers and is the principal inventor on more than 30 patents.  In his spare time, Lieber founded a nanotechnology company, Nanosys, Inc., with the goal of revolutionizing commercial applications in chemical and biological sensing, computing, photonics and information storage.

Christoph Gerber

Christoph Gerber
University of Basal

AFM Technology: Beyond Imaging Applications, Towards Personalized Medical Diagnostics

Friday, February 23, 2007
3:00 PM
Berger Auditorium, Skirkanich Hall
210 South 33rd Street

Christoph Gerber is Director for Scientific Communication of the National Center of Competence for Nanoscale Science at the Institute of Physics, University of Basel, Switzerland, and formerly a research staff member in nanoscale science at the IBM research laboratory in Rüschlikon. He has served as project leader on various programs of the Swiss National Science Foundation. For the past 25 years, his research has focused on nanoscale science as a pioneer in scanning probe microscopy, making major contributions to the invention of the scanning tunneling microscope and the atomic force microscope (AFM). He is a co-inventor of biochemical sensors based on AFM technology. He is author and co-author of over one hundred scientific papers and has been cited more than 14,500 times in crossdisciplinary fields placing him among the “one hundred worldwide most cited researchers in physical sciences.” Gerber is a fellow of the American Physical Society and a fellow of the Institute of Physics (UK). His IP portfolio contains 37 patents and patent publications.

 

2006

Steven M. Block

Steven M. Block
Stanford University

Wednesday, October 25, 2006
4:00 PM
Wu & Chen Auditorium, Levine Hall
3330 Walnut Street

NanoDay keynote speaker, Dr. Steven M. Block was awarded the 2nd Annual NBIC Research Excellence Award.  Block is a biophysicist and professor at Stanford University in both the Department of Biological Sciences and the Department of Applied Physics.  His laboratory has pioneered the use of laser-based optical traps (or “optical tweezers”) to study the nanoscale motions of individual biomolecules.  His group was the first to develop instrumentation that resolved the individual molecular steps taken by kinesin motors moving along microtubules, which measure 8nm.  Block is a strong proponent of nanoscience and the potential interplay between biology and nanotechnology.

 

2005

Horst Stormer

Horst Stormer
Columbia University

Wednesday, October 26, 2005
3:30 PM
Wu & Chen Auditorium, Levine Hall
3330 Walnut Street

Horst Stormer was born in Frankfurt, Germany, and received his Diploma degree in Physics in 1974 from the local Goethe University and a Ph.D. in 1977 from the University of Stuttgart. He completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the renowned Bell Laboratories in Murray Hill, NJ where he spent the next 25 years. He became a Member of Technical Staff in 1978 and headed the Semiconductor Physics Research Department from 1983 to 1992. He then became Director of the Physical Research Laboratory of, heading most of the fundamental physics research activities. In 1997, he moved to Adjunct Physics Director of Bell Labs, now part of Lucent Technologies, and became a Professor in the Department of Physics and the Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics of Columbia University.

Horst Stormer has worked extensively on the properties of two-dimensional electron sheets in semiconductors and published more than 200 papers on this and on related subjects. In 1978 Stormer co-invented a technique that “speeds up” electrons in semiconductors. The world’s fastest and quietest transistors are based on this principle. The very same invention has lead to the discovery of amazing new physics, in which Stormer participated in 1982. Professor Stormer and his colleagues received numerous awards for the discovery of the fractional quantum Hall effect, the most prestigious of which being the 1998 Nobel Prize in Physics. His recent work focuses on transport in single molecules. In addition to maintaining a distinguished research program, Horst Stormer has been an enthusiastic spokesperson for the nanotechnology community.

 


 

Graduate Student Awards

2008
Yeonwoong Jung, graduate student
Materials Science and Engineering
 
2007
Michael Fischbein, graduate student
Physics and Astronomy
 
2006
P. Peter Ghorghchian, graduate student
Bioengineering and Medicine
 
2005
Rui Shao, graduate student
Materials Science and Engineering

 

 

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